Schaumburg

The Village of Schaumburg was incorporated on March 7, 1956, but the heritage of Schaumburg dates back to the much earlier times when the first inhabitants of the area were members of the Sauk, Fox, Pottawatomie, and Kickapoo Indian tribes.

Schaumburg’s earliest residents were primarily German-speaking immigrants and their days consisted of farming, community and family. In many ways that remains true today, although now Schaumburg is a mecca of commercial activity. 

By the mid-nineteenth century, settlers first began to arrive from Germany and the eastern United States. The first recorded settler of Schaumburg Township was German-born Johann Sunderlage. He and his family occupied their land in the Township until the federal land sale of 1842 allowed them to purchase the property and obtain the deed. 

In 1840, 56 percent of the Township households originated from the eastern United States, while 28 percent were German-born. By the 1850s, the population mix had settled to 28 percent “Yankee” and 48 percent German.

By 1870, Schaumburg Township had become completely German. Land records show that all the property in the Township was owned by German immigrants or their descendants. This pattern emerged as many Yankee settlers continued to travel west for the promise of newly opened lands on the Great Plains. The land they occupied in Schaumburg was then purchased by German-born immigrants.

Schaumburg Township remained almost exclusively under German ownership until the Great Depression of the 1930s. The Depression caused the foreclosure on some German-owned farms which were then purchased by non-German individuals and companies.

Source: Village of Schaumburg

Your choices are endless for places to stay in Schaumburg, there are 30 properties to pick from. All in close proximity to a wide range of attractions.

Hundreds of restaurants from Chicago-style pizza to familiar steakhouses and family-owned and operated restaurants are waiting in Schaumburg.